Why Non-Programmers Should Learn SQL

In today’s digital age, information is constantly being created, collected, stored, and analyzed. Every aspect of customer behavior can be translated into data points and interpreted by different technologies. With the unstoppable expansion of the data universe, organizations need more of their employees to have the analytical skills to comprehend the ubiquitous amount of data and transform it into actionable insights.

To analyze data, it first needs to be extracted from databases. Currently, the most popular language used for querying and manipulating databases is SQL. While we often think of SQL as a tool used in technical roles, such as programmers and data scientists, many people today in “non-technical” roles such as marketing and sales are being trained in SQL to better leverage data and extend their professional capabilities. 



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Why You Should Learn SQL to Boost Your Career

Out of 13 million new jobs that have been created in the United States in the last 10 years, over 8.5 million have required skills in technology. And as the future of work moves forward, the tech skills necessary to succeed in these new roles will only become more advanced. Skilled workers need to be able to work with technology beyond an internet browser or word processing application.

Jobs like Human Resources (HR), that never seemed to need technology before, are now specifically looking for applicants with skills in data analysis. In a survey done by SHRM, over half of survey responders require data analysis when hiring for their HR department.



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Udacity Launches New SQL Nanodegree Program for Today’s Data-driven Professionals

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Think about the role that Big Data plays in our day-to-day lives and how we contribute to it. Every time we tweet, send emails, search online, or ride in a connected car, we’re creating thousands of data points. 

Those data sets are used by companies (both large and small) to help inform the creation and improvements of new products, services, and business strategies.

It’s predicted that by 2025, an estimated 463 exabytes of data will be created each day globally, reports Weforum.org. As more data is created, more companies have expressed a need for qualified employees with SQL skills (Structured Query Language, the first language of data analysis, and universal language for relational databases) to analyze and create actionable intelligence based on that data.



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